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Face to face Interview Preparation

An interview gives you the opportunity to convince a potential employer you are the best person for the job, and to make sure the job and company are right for you.​

  • Research the company, your interviewer and the role

  • Use the company website, Google and LinkedIn.

  • Prepare for and plan your journey the night before

    • If you’re flying in for an interview, of course you’re going to want to get your flights booked as soon as possible, and it’s also important to remember that you need to give yourself enough time after the interview to get to the airport – the interview might go so well that it runs over time so take this into account.

    • If you’re travelling locally, weigh up your best options on how to get there. Should you drive yourself (parking?), take public transport, a taxi? If you get the train, do you need to walk from the closest station? Take all of this into consideration. You don’t want to be late or flustered from running around.

  • Prepare copies of your CV to hand out to who you’ll be meeting with
    • Managers often run from one meeting to another, so they might not have had time to go back to their desk and collect the copy of your CV they had prepared before coming to interview. Bear this in mind and take copies you can hand out, just in case.
  • Prepare questions to ask during the interview
    • Usually this is following on from the telephone interview
  • Arrive 15 minutes early. This gives you a moment to collect your thoughts and catch your breath, and will allow you to enter the interview far calmer and more prepared to shine.
  • SWOT or STAR interview preparation methods
    • Both methods can really help you to be ready to answer any questions you might face in the interview room.
    • SWOT – Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats
    • STAR – Situation, Task, Action, Result

Click here for more information about SWOT and STAR, and how they can help you in your interview.

  • Be confident!
  • Take notes during the interview
    • Most interviewers don’t mind this but it’s always nice to ask as a courtesy. This will give you information to reflect on after the interview and ultimately help you decide if you want to accept an offer, should it come to that stage, or simply proceed with the interview process.
  • Ask questions

When the interviewer asks if you have any questions, ask them! This is where those questions you wrote down will help you out. Asking questions tells your interviewer that you have an interest in them or the role/company/team etc. Your interviewer might also be the only person who can answer your questions, so ask them.

  • As the meeting is naturally wrapping up, ask about next steps

Again, this shows your interest in the role and that you’re keen to proceed with the interview process. However, if it is your final interview then salary and accepting an offer may form part of the discussion at the end of the interview so make sure you’re comfortable answering these questions. Ask your recruitment consultant for advice if need be.





Research the company, your interviewer and the role

Use the company website, Google and LinkedIn.

Prepare for and plan your journey the night before

       







If you’re flying in for an interview, of course you’re going to want to get your flights booked as soon as possible, and it’s also important to remember that you need to give yourself enough time after the interview to get to the airport – the interview might go so well that it runs over time so take this into account.

If you’re travelling locally, weigh up your best options on how to get there. Should you drive yourself (parking?), take public transport, a taxi? If you get the train, do you need to walk from the closest station? Take all of this into consideration. You don’t want to be late or flustered from running around.

  • Prepare copies of your CV to hand out to who you’ll be meeting withUse whatever tools you have at your disposal to find out as much as possible about the company e.g. products or services, mission, history and clients.
  • Study the job description and try to anticipate questions you are likely to be asked and practise answers in advance.


  • Prepare copies of your CV to hand out to who you’ll be meeting with

    • Managers often run from one meeting to another, so they might not have had time to go back to their desk and collect the copy of your CV they had prepared before coming to interview. Bear this in mind and take copies you can hand out, just in case.

  • Prepare questions to ask during the interview

    • Usually this is following on from the telephone interview

  • Arrive 15 minutes early. This gives you a moment to collect your thoughts and catch your breath, and will allow you to enter the interview far calmer and more prepared to shine.

  • SWOT or STAR interview preparation methods, Click here for more information about SWOT and STAR, and how they can help you in your interview.

    • Both methods can really help you to be ready to answer any questions you might face in the interview room.

    • SWOT – Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats

    • STAR – Situation, Task, Action, Result

  • Be confident!

  • Take notes during the interview

    • Most interviewers don’t mind this but it’s always nice to ask as a courtesy. This will give you information to reflect on after the interview and ultimately help you decide if you want to accept an offer, should it come to that stage, or simply proceed with the interview process.

  • Ask questions

When the interviewer asks if you have any questions, ask them! This is where those questions you wrote down will help you out. Asking questions tells your interviewer that you have an interest in them or the role/company/team etc. Your interviewer might also be the only person who can answer your questions, so ask them.

  • As the meeting is naturally wrapping up, ask about next steps

Again, this shows your interest in the role and that you’re keen to proceed with the interview process. However, if it is your final interview then salary and accepting an offer may form part of the discussion at the end of the interview so make sure you’re comfortable answering these questions. Ask your recruitment consultant for advice if need be.